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The Sharp Shack

Services Unavailable from

October 27 - November 21, 2019

The Sharp Shack

Sharper than new!

Services Unavailable from

October 27 - November 21, 2019

FAQs

Can I bring my knives to you at your shop?

Yes!  Most customers do.  Simply call or text to be sure I am here before you come.  (I work from home, and I am in and out.)

How long does it take to get my knives back?

Often I am able to sharpen your knives while you wait.  If you prefer to drop them off, I almost always have them for you the next day.

Why do you charge the same price for most knives, regardless of size or shape?

We have found that it all averages out.  Most people send in a mixture of small and large knives, and it is so much simpler this way than charging  $3.50 for a 4” knife and $7.00 for a 10” knife.  No measuring, no calculating, all you have to do is add up how many knives you have.  (If you have specialty knives, custom sporting knives, etc., call or email for pricing.)

How do I know when my knives need sharpening?

When you can no longer achieve a fine edge with a few strokes on a ceramic hone or leather strop,  it’s time to have the blade restored by the Sharp Shack!

How often do I need to have you sharpen my knives?

Most home cooks find that a  two or three times yearly sharpening is sufficient to maintain a fine edge on good quality knives.  Lower quality knives or knives that get unusually heavy use may require more frequent sharpening.

I have a handmade custom hunting knife. I have had poor results with other sharpeners. Can you really do a good job with this type of knife?

Yes, we can.  We have the expertise to put an unbelievably precise edge on high quality knives.   Money back guarantee.

Can a serrated knife be sharpened?

Yes.  Most home sharpening devices can only damage the blade on a serrated knife.  We can sharpen any size serrated blade, even inexpensive ones.

How do I maintain the edge once my knives have been sharpened?

Once the correct bevel has been put on the blade, one or two light strokes on each side of the blade with a ceramic hone will put the blade back to a “razor edge.”  (If you don’t have a ceramic hone, an old leather belt works very well for a strop.)   We do not recommend any “pull through” sharpening device, or any “diamond” steel. These will damage a perfectly sharpened blade, greatly reducing its life.

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